Island Hopping

Despite being known as Australia’s only island state, Tasmania is, in fact, an archipelago of 334 islands, all of which are hugely diverse, offering a wide range of habitats to birds and mammals.  

A visit to one of Tasmania’s offshore islands will a very special dimension to your holiday and with access ranging from a 15-minute ferry ride to a 25-minute flight, it is considerably easier than you might imagine. 

There are at least four islands worth adding to your itinerary wish-list, each of which is well worth visiting for anything from a day to several nights - and not just for naturalists. Every island is a melting pot of history and culture, a couple are even notable for their own food and wine, and a couple are virtually a microcosm of Tasmania. All the islands have their very own ‘unique selling point’ but in point of fact, there are several reasons to visit all of them. While some can be included as part of a guided tour or cruise, a couple of the islands are surely destinations in their own right.

Indeed, if you only have a few days to spare on Tassie, you might find it to be a far better use of your time to spend all your time on one of the larger of Tasmania's offshore islands rather than trying to fit too much into a rushed self-drive tour.

For the ultimate twin-centre Australian Wildlife Holiday, do consider a few nights on Kangaroo Island, which is located an easy hop from Adelaide in South Australia, and the perfect destination to combine with Tasmania.  Ask us about adding Kangaroo Island onto your Tasmanian Odyssey. 


Maria Island
Maria Island

If walking and wildlife are high on your list of interests, don’t miss Maria Island off your list of places to visit in Tasmania. A Noah’s Ark for endangered birds and animals is the best way of describing this uninhabited island paradise, which lies 30 minutes by boat off the east coast, about an hour’s drive from Hobart.  

A must-visit for naturalists, Maria (pronounced Mar-I-a), like Bruny Island, has all 12 endemic birds, along with Forester Kangaroos, wallabies, wombats and Tasmanian devils. Maria Island can be explored on foot and by bike. You can get there as a day trip by ferry or by a small guided family-run cruise, or you can step off the world for a few nights with a four-day guided walk.

 

Read more...

Bruny Island

Less than an hour from Hobart lies a wild, ravishingly beautiful island.  Accessed by a small ferry from Kettering, it is, in fact, two islands – North Bruny and South Bruny – joined by The Neck, a narrow isthmus.  With a population of just 600, Bruny was not so long ago one of Tasmania’s best-kept secrets and a weekend escape for a handful of Hobartians.  Now it is a wonderful addition to any Tasmanian Odyssey. Read more...

Bruny Island
Flinders Island
Flinders Island

Nothing will prepare you for the spiritual tranquillity and mesmerising wild beauty of Flinders Island. The island is, in fact, the largest in the Furneaux Group of 52 islands – mountain summits lying in the Bass Strait just off the northeastern coast of Tasmania – which presents a whole new island-hopping opportunity in its own right.

Flinders Island (named after British navigator Matthew Flinders) is best accessed by air, on a 19-seat Embraer from Launceston, or via Melbourne making it an easy and obvious inclusion on a Victoria-Tasmania itinerary. Read more...

Sarah Island

Sarah Island lies just off Tasmania's Wild West coast in the remote reaches of vast Macquarie Harbour, surrounded by the harsh and unforgiving temperate rainforest.  Established in 1821, Sarah Island holds the starkest evidence of the appalling conditions to which Tasmania’s convicts were subjected, as they were forced to fell the mighty Huon Pine for boatbuilding.  Read more...

Sarah Island
The Tasman Peninsula
The Tasman Peninsula

While The Tasman Peninsula is not, strictly speaking, an island, the isthmus which joins it to the mainland, Eaglehawk Neck, is so narrow - just 30 metres at its narrowest point - that during the 19th Century a chain of ferocious dogs were strung across to prevent the escape of desperate convicts. Read more...

Kangaroo Island

No, you  haven't ended up on the wrong website - Kangaroo Island is definitely not part of Tasmania! However, with a similar ethos and equally abundant yet very different wildlife and birds (including Koalas and Sea Lions), it is a wonderful complement to any Tasmanian Odyssey. With direct flights between Hobart and Adelaide, it is also an easy addition and ideal for those who want to see a little more of South Australia without too much arduous travelling. Read more...

Kangaroo Island
CTA Buttons Bar

Get in touch to secure your very own Tasmanian Odyssey

Photo Credits: Stuart Gibson, Dietmar Kahles, Tamara Thurman, Tourism Tasmania, RCT Destinations, Paul Hoelen